Research Staff

Director
Jane Koziol-McLain

Founding Director
Lynne Giddings

Researchers
Christine McLean
Terry Ann Dobbs

Faculty Staff
Brenda Costa-Scorse
Chris Webb
Graham Howie
Grant Gillon
Jackie Feather
Mieke Couling                                                       
Paul Davey

Postdoctoral and Research Associates
Amanda Young-Hauser
Bronwyn Tunnage
Claire Gear
Jacquelyn Campbell
Janet Fanslow
Susann Platt
Tess Soulie


Amanda Young-Hauser

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Brenda Costa-Scorse, BHSc (nursing), Dip Adult Tertiary Teaching, RGON

Department of Paramedicine and Emergency Management

Email:Brenda.Costa-Scorse@aut.ac.nz

Brenda's enthsuiasm for Paramedicine and Emergency Management is  contagious. Proposed projects include: trauma scoring, effectiveness of  assessing Paramedic clinical judgement with high fidelity clinical  simulation compared with use of a viva voce, comparison of patterns of  injury in two NZ skifields, and disaster recovery research to explore  ways in which to promote community resilience.

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Bronwyn Tunnage Clinical Research Training Fellow

Email:btunnage@aut.ac.nz

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Claire Gear Research Officer

Email:cgear@aut.ac.nz

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Chris Webb
Senior Lecturer ATB - Paramedicine & Emergency Management
Email:chrwebb@aut.ac.nz

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Christine McLean Research Project Manager
Email: christine.mclean@aut.ac.nz

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Dr Graham Howie                                                     

Senior Lecturer - Paramedicine & Emergency Managemement                                            

Email:ghowie@aut.ac.nz

Dr Graham Howie has a PhD in physiology. In his doctorate he looked at how maternal diet during pregnancy affects the organs of the developing offspring. In particular he studied the pancreas and the regulation of insulin secretion, and showed that what mothers eat while pregnant can influence the developing pancreas in the infant, and this can predispose to diabetic problems many years later, in the adult life of the offspring. He also has an interest in neuroscience – his masters research was in neuroanatomy. Graham has over 30 years in the ambulance world – as a front-line paramedic, as a Station Officer, as a clinical coach, and as a teacher and programme leader within ambulance education. He taught at AUT through the 1990s, before returning to the ambulance service. He has recently re-joined the Paramedic School at AUT University, bringing his depth of experience as a scholar and lecturer, to help with the postgraduate programme and to provide supervision for masters and doctoral students. Several research foci already exist within the discipline, for example in cardiology and in injury prevention, with students enrolled in innovative research projects.

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Dr Grant Gillon                                                         
Senior Lecturer - Paramedicine & Emergency Management
Email:ggillon@aut.ac.nz

Dr. Grant Gillon is a senior lecturer, paramedicine and emergency management at Aut University building on his career in the NZ Fire Service.   Dr. Gillon's PhD research was the first to study the relationships between politicians in the MMP era and the resulting effect on public policy development and changes in New Zealand. This work enables policy change forecasting rather than backward assessment of causation influences. The research followed a time in parliamentary politics having served in Parliament between 1996 and 2002.  During this period his involvement included civil defence & emergency management as well as fire service policy areas.  Dr Gillon's current research focuses on the public policy aspects of emergency management.

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Dr Jackie Feather  

Senior Lecturer - Psychology

Email:jfeather@aut.ac.nz

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Jacquelyn C. Campbell,

FAAN, RN, PhD

Associate Dean for faculty affiars / Professor

John Hopkin's University (USA)Email:

jcampbel@son.jhmi.edu

Dr. Campbell's overall research and policy initiatives focus in the  area of family violence and violence against women. She has been  Principal Investigator on three National Institute of Health (NIH), two  Centre for Disease Control (CDC), one Department of Defence and one  National Institute of Justice research grants on battering. Specific  research areas include risk factors and assessment for intimate partner  homicide, abuse during pregnancy, marital rape, physical and mental  health effects of intimate partner violence, prevention of dating  violence and interventions to prevent and address domestic violence.  Dr. Campbell's awards include Fellowship in the American Academy of  Nursing, the Kellogg National Leadership Program, a Robert Wood Johnson  Urban Health Fellowship, three honorary doctorates, the Simon Visiting  Scholar at the University of Manchester in the UK, and elected  membership in the Institute of Medicine. Dr. Campbell also has worked  with wife abuse shelters and advocacy organizations for the last  twenty-five years. She has facilitated support groups and served on the  board of four shelters. Currently, she is on the Boards of Directors of  the Family Violence Prevention Fund in San Francisco, the House of Ruth  in Baltimore, and has served on the congressionally appointed  Department of Defence Task Force on Domestic Violence.

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Jane Koziol-McLain, PhD, RN (Co-Director)
Professor of Nursing
Email: Jane.Koziol-McLain@aut.ac.nz

Jane joined AUT and the ITRU in 2001 after completing an  interdisciplinary violence prevention post-doctoral fellowship at Johns  Hopkins University in the U.S. Jane has 18 years experience in  emergency nursing and 13 years experience in health care research.  Emergency healthcare, injury prevention and family violence have been  the focus of her research aimed at informing practice and policy. She  is involved with several mixed method studies in New Zealand to improve  healthcare system responsiveness to women and children living with  partner violence. In addition to her nursing and research background  she has worked or volunteered in women's refuges in both New Zealand  and the US.

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Janet Fanslow 

Senior Lecturer, The University of Auckland
Email: j.fanslow@auckland.ac.nz 

Dr Janet Fanslow is an Associate Professor in Mental Health Promotion at the School of Population Health, University of Auckland, and Co-Director of the New Zealand Family Violence Clearinghouse. She has been engaged in violence prevention research since 1989, and has worked on: descriptive epidemiological studies of violence; the development and evaluation of programmes to promote appropriate health care response to victims; initial evaluation of the Family Safety Teams; national and regional consultation process to identify priorities for research; and activities related to the standardization of definitions and measurement of partner violence. She has authored over 60 publications, including refereed journal articles, national guidelines, and other works. She is co-author of the book Intentional Injury in New Zealand, and sole author of Beyond Zero Tolerance: Key issues and future directions for family violence work in New Zealand, a commissioned report by the Families Commission. She is also author of the New Zealand Ministry of Health Family Violence Intervention Guidelines: Child and Partner Abuse (11,000 copies in print); and co-author on the related Ministry of Health guidelines on Elder Abuse and Neglect (3,500 copies in print). Her research includes a Health Research Council funded population based study of violence against women, which was part of the World Health Organization multi-country study. This project interviewed a cross-section of almost 3,000 New Zealand women, to identify the prevalence of intimate partner violence, document its health consequences, identify risk and protective factors, and identify strategies and services used by victims of IPV.Janet Fanslow

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Jeffery H. Coben, MD
Professor Departments of Emergency Medicine and Community Medicine Injury Control Research Centre (ICRC)
and Centre for Rural Emergency Medicine
West Virginia University (USA)
Email:JCOBEN@wpahs.org

Dr. Coben is a graduate of the University of Pittsburgh School of  Medicine and completed a combined residency program in Emergency  Medicine/Internal Medicine at Northwestern University Medicat Centre.  He is currently scientific director for the Injury Control Research  Centre  and Director of the Center for Rural Emergency Medicine at West  Virginia University. Dr. Coben's research utilises public healtha nd  health services research methods to examine topics relevant to  emergency medicine and trauma prevention. Major areas of concentration  include intimate partner violence and transportation-related injuries.

In 2000-2001, Dr. Coben served as Senior Scholar in Residence for  Domestic Violence at the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality,  U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, during which he completed  a project identifying performance measures for evaluating  hospital-based family violence programs. The resulting product, the Delphi Instrument for Hospital-Based Domestic Violence Programs,  is currently being used in an evaluation project monitoring New Zealand  healthcare system responsiveness to women and children victims of  family violence. Dr Coben serves as a co-investigator on that project  that is funded by the Ministry of Health.

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Lynne Giddings, PhD, RGON, RM (Co-Director)
Associate Professor
ITRU Co-Director
Email: Lynne.Giddings@aut.ac.nz

Lynne's passion is to research issues in education and practice that  focus on women's health issues and social justice. Current  collaborative research projects focus on: trauma (discourse analysis),  qualitative researchers experience of seeking ethical approval  (grounded theory), on-line learning (survey), Women Seeking Healthcare  In Aotearoa/New Zealand: Prevalence of Intimate Partner Violence  (qualitative descriptive), and the life stories of nursing and  midwifery researchers in Aotearoa/New Zealand (case study). Lynne's  work is strongly influenced by the critical, poststructural  (postmodern) and feminist research philosophical approaches, especially  those that use participatory methods. She has experience in using  grounded theory and other qualitative interpretive methodologies as  well as various quantitative methods and historical research  (life-history and narrative inquiry).

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Paul Davey Head of Discipline - Paramedicine & Emergency Medicine

Email:pdavey@aut.ac.nz

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Snehaa ChandMHSc Thesis

Counsellors' experiences of working with intellectually disabled people

who have been sexually abused - A thematic analysis

The study aims to explore counsellors' experiences of counselling clientswho are intellectually disabled and who have been sexually abused.  This qualitative study will assist in identifying the issues raised for counsellors

when working with such people.

Enquiries for Snehaa can be directed to Dr Jackie Feather via emailjfeather@aut.ac.nz

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Terry Dobbs, M.A. (Childhood & Youth Studies) (Dist). PostGrad Dip Child Advocacy (Dist) CQSW
Research Officer
Email: tannedob@aut.ac.nz

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